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SOME EARLY WARNING SIGNS OF DIABETES

posted Jul 16, 2012 10:55:18 by MsJojoAlwayskeepsitreal-SoBlessedDupree
Diabetes is a medical condition that has reached epic proportions in the United States. There are more than 25 million people living with diabetes according to the American Diabetes Association, and about one third of those people are unaware that they are diabetic. Another 79 million people are pre-diabetic, meaning if they don't make some healthy changes in their lives, they will develop diabetes. Here are some of the early warning signs of diabetes.

Excessive Thirst

Those who suffer from diabetes have extra sugar in their blood, forcing the kidneys to work harder to filter the sugar out of the blood. This causes increased urination and then increased thirst when dehydration results. So if a person notices that he is substantially thirstier than normal, he might want to visit the doctor.

Tingling Hands And Feet

Excess sugar in the blood plays a major role in nerve damage, a condition called Diabetic Neuropathy. This nerve damage is one of the main causes of amputations among diabetics. So if a person notices tingling in her hands or feet, or if she is experiencing a burning sensation in her hands, arms, legs or feet for an extended period of time, she should definitely consult a doctor. The nerve damage is not reversible in most cases.

For more information on pain or tingling in the extremities, see Diabetic Foot Pain And Complications.)

Weight Loss

Diabetes is considered a metabolic condition and it affects the way the body uses energy. Because excess sugar builds up in the blood and is excreted in the person's urine, this can lead to weight loss because the loss of sugar also means the loss of calories. So while the body is losing sugar, it's also losing weight. The constant excretion of sugar into the urine will also lead to increased hunger.

Frequent Urination

As mentioned earlier, the excess sugar in the body that is the hallmark of diabetes forces the kidneys to work overtime to rid the body of that sugar. The harder the kidneys work, the more a person will have to urinate. This can lead to dehydration and increased thirst. It can also lead to kidney damage and even kidney failure over time if left untreated.

Slow Healing Sores

This symptom is somewhat of a mystery. Doctors and diabetics alike have observed for decades that sores and wounds seem to heal at an extremely slow rate. However, research into this phenomenon is inconclusive. No one really knows why it is, but it has been observed that people who are diabetic don't heal as quickly. One theory is that the excess sugar in the blood interferes with the body's ability to heal, but more research is needed in this area.

Blurred Vision

As we've already learned, diabetes pulls fluids from tissues, causing dehydration. When fluid is pulled from the eye, as often happens in diabetes patients, the result is an inability to focus the eyes. Over time if the diabetes is not well controlled, it can affect the blood vessels in the eye leading to partial vision loss or total blindness. If a person notices that their vision suddenly changes, it is always a cause for concern and should be checked out.

To learn more about vision problems amongst diabetics, see Diabetic Eye Disease: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Vision.)

Feeling Very Hungry

As we mentioned earlier, the excess sugar that causes frequent urination also causes the excessive loss of sugar, which means that the body is also losing calories which accounts for a sudden drop in weight. But this loss of calories also leaves the body feeling very hungry, which leads to more eating, thus perpetuating the cycle. So feeling excessively hungry all the time, along with the other symptoms on our list, should prompt someone to visit their doctor.

Swollen Gums

Diabetes weakens the body's ability to fight off germs, many of which enter the body through the mouth. This can cause a whole host of problems with the mouth including painful swollen gums, the erosion of the jaw bone, and over time, tooth loss. Abscesses in the mouth are also possible. If someone had dental problems before developing diabetes, they could find that those problems get significantly worse.

Frequent Infections

Just like slow healing wounds, this one is kind of a mystery. Doctors and researchers aren't exactly sure how it happens, only that diabetes affects the body's ability to fight off infections. Because of this, those who have diabetes may find themselves ill, frequently. For diabetic women, the most common types of infections are urinary tract infections and vaginal infections.

Fatigue

When the body isn't working right, fatigue will almost always be an issue, and so it is the case with diabetes. While fatigue alone isn't a definitive sign of diabetes, when it is combined with other warning signs on this list, it becomes significant. Fatigue is caused by a number of factors including the extra workload placed on the kidneys and the loss of sugar, which provides less fuel for the body.
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9 replies
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MsJojoAlwayskeepsitreal-SoBlessedDupree said Jul 16, 2012 14:13:14
If you're an insulin-injecting diabetic, you should make a habit of inspecting your insulin vial every time you load a syringe. Watch for changes in the insulin's appearance, such as discoloration, cloudiness or crystallization in the liquid. If you notice any such changes, discard the vial.

Keep in mind that other changes are not as easily visible, so stay alert for any indication that your insulin may not be working as well, such as aberrations in your blood glucose levels. Be sure to date your vial when you begin using it, and discard it after 28 days or as advised by the manufacturer. Insulin should be stored at room temperature and never frozen or exposed to heat. Discard an insulin bottle if it is damaged or dropped.

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MsJojoAlwayskeepsitreal-SoBlessedDupree said Jul 16, 2012 14:21:24
Eating right is one of the ways you can do your health a favor if you have type 2 diabetes. Here are some healthy twists on favorite recipes that are easy to make and sure to pass the family taste test
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MsJojoAlwayskeepsitreal-SoBlessedDupree said Jul 16, 2012 14:25:37
If one of your type 2 diabetes goals is to lose weight or maintain your weight, portion control can help you do it. Controlling your portion sizes is a great way to keep tabs on your calorie intake.
When you combine portion control with exercise, you can make real headway in reaching your personal weight goals. It's good to know that losing just 10 to 15 lbs could make a difference.
Use these easy visual cues to see what different portion sizes look like for different foods. With that knowledge, you can plan well-balanced meals. If you like, you can use measuring cups and spoons to check portion sizes too
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MsJojoAlwayskeepsitreal-SoBlessedDupree said Jul 16, 2012 14:28:00
MEAL PLANS If you're living with type 2 diabetes, a meal plan is a great way to start building healthy meals. Your meal plan can be your go-to guide for choosing what foods to eat and when. A successful meal plan can help you stay on target for your blood sugar numbers and weight goals.

Planning and shopping ahead for meals lets you take control of a key part of managing your type 2 diabetes—your diet. By following your meal plan, you'll know you're eating healthy, balanced meals that you and your family can enjoy together.

Talk to your healthcare team or dietician about designing a meal plan that works for you. Give them an honest picture of your lifestyle so they can create a meal plan that fits well with your real-life routine, eating habits, and weight goals.

Some meal plans use planning tools as their foundation, such as:

The plate method that divvies up your plate into different sections for different foods
Carb counting that sets daily carbohydrates limits
The glycemic index or "GI" that ranks how quickly different foods raise blood glucose levels
An "exchange system" that assigns values to foods that you can exchange for others of similar value
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MsJojoAlwayskeepsitreal-SoBlessedDupree said Jul 16, 2012 14:30:09
How to Read Food Labels Beyond the list of ingredients listed on the foods you buy, you can dig deeper by reading the Nutrition Facts labels. These labels were developed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to help shoppers like you learn about the nutrients in the food they buy. Knowing how to read food labels can help you make good food choices for managing your type 2 diabetes.
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MsJojoAlwayskeepsitreal-SoBlessedDupree said Jul 16, 2012 17:45:22
There are members of Diabetes Daily in over 200 countries. Some are logging in from mobile phones in the heart of Africa, others from skyscrapers in Dubai. Every member of this community is bound together by one desire: to live a healthy, happy and hopeful life.

Together, we share our experiences, build collective wisdom, and change the world one person at a time.

To think: a decade ago, none of this was even possible!


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MsJojoAlwayskeepsitreal-SoBlessedDupree said Jul 16, 2012 17:47:41
PEOPLE REALLY NEED TO DO MORE STUDYING ON DIABETES.
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MsJojoAlwayskeepsitreal-SoBlessedDupree said Jul 30, 2012 11:31:10
IMPORTANT INFORMATION......If you're an insulin-injecting diabetic, you should make a habit of inspecting your insulin vial every time you load a syringe. Watch for changes in the insulin's appearance, such as discoloration, cloudiness or crystallization in the liquid. If you notice any such changes, discard the vial.

Keep in mind that other changes are not as easily visible, so stay alert for any indication that your insulin may not be working as well, such as aberrations in your blood glucose levels. Be sure to date your vial when you begin using it, and discard it after 28 days or as advised by the manufacturer. Insulin should be stored at room temperature and never frozen or exposed to heat. Discard an insulin bottle if it is damaged or dropped.

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MsJojoAlwayskeepsitreal-SoBlessedDupree said Jul 30, 2012 11:42:12
If you're one of the millions of Americans at risk for diabetes—or if you have it already—we're going to guess you're pretty sick of hearing the word "no." No pasta. No pizza. And definitely no dessert. Guess what, though? That message is dead wrong. You can eat to beat diabetes, and we have an expert-tested—and scrumptious—solution to prove it.

More than 14,000 people have followed the simple plan outlined in the Diabetes Rescue Diet, and those who did slashed their diabetes risk by an astounding 83%. Even better, when you follow our plan there are no forbidden foods, no carb and calorie counting, and, well, no more "nos."
More than 14,000 people have followed the simple plan outlined in the Diabetes Rescue Diet, and those who did slashed their diabetes risk by an astounding 83%. Even better, when you follow our plan there are no forbidden foods, no carb and calorie counting, and, well, no more "nos."

Using the principles of the Mediterranean diet, which people around the world have followed for centuries, the Diabetes Rescue Diet protects against heart disease, high blood pressure, cancer, and, of course, diabetes. Here's how it works: By loading up on 10 miracle foods, you will begin to regulate your blood sugar naturally—without feeling starved, deprived, and bummed out. Extra bonus: You'll almost certainly lose weight in the process, without even trying.

The recipes on this plan are delicious, filling, and easy to make at home with few ingredients. You'll enjoy cheese pizza, savory salmon, pasta Bolognese—even dessert! YOU NEED TO READ MORE ABOUT THE DIABETES RESCUE DIET PLAN!!!
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